HOME        |        ABOUT        |        COPYRIGHT        |        CONTACT        |        MY OTHER BLOG        |         EVENTS        

Saturday, April 5, 2014

Kusli ~ Chhattisgarh Cuisine


I came across "kusli" among a list of Chhattisgarh recipes, while searching online. The name intrigued me and when I explored a little further, it turned out to be what we call kajjjikayalu in Telugu. These crescent shaped, crispy shells with a sweet filling are prepared through out India and known by different regional names such as kajjikayalu, karjikayi or gujiya. I am guessing the sweet filling that goes into these shells are unique region-wise. Gujiyas usually contain a mawa filling, while the south Indian ones usually have a coconut-sugar or ground roasted chickpea-sugar filling. Now these kuslis have a semolina-almond filling which was quite new to me and I had to try them for that reason alone. The cardamom flavored filling was very delicious and the crisp kuslis were a delight as expected.

Ingredients: (Yield 12 kuslis)
1 & 1/4 cup all-purpose flour / maida
1 tbsp oil
a pinch of salt
1/4 cup ground almonds
1/4 cup raisins
1/4 cup semolina (I used fine semolina.)
1/2 cup powdered sugar
1 tsp cardamom powder
3 tbsp coconut flakes
Oil to fry

Method:
* Combine the flour, 1 tbsp oil and salt in a mixing bowl. Gradually add water and make a thick dough like poori or chapathi dough. Let it rest for about 30 minutes.
* Combine ground almonds, sugar, semolina, raisins, coconut and ground cardamom in a bowl and mix well. This is our filling and keep it aside.
* Heat the oil in a small sized wok / kadai. If you don't own one, any deep bottomed nonstick pan would also work. To test whether the oil is hot enough for frying, put a pinch of dough into the hot oil. If it sizzles and comes to surface immediately, then it is ready to fry the kusli.
* Meanwhile, divide the dough into 12 portions and shape them into small balls. Roll each ball into a thin circle, slightly bigger than the circumference of the mould. Place the rolled out dough circle on the greased mould.
* Place a couple of tablespoons of the filling in it. Take care that the filling is in the center and not along the edges. If the filling is on edges, they cannot be sealed.
If you don't own a mould, place the filling on one half of the rolled out dough. Wet your fingers with water and run around the edges. Fold the other half over the filling so that it is semi circular in shape and seal the edges firmly. If the edges are not sealed properly, the filling would spill out into the hot oil.
* Fold the mould and press it very firmly so that the filling doesn't come out during the frying process. Trim off the extra dough, outside the mould and put it back into the dough container. 
* Slowly open the mould and gently lift off the kusli and place it aside. Repeat the process with the remaining dough and the filling. And remember to grease the mould each time it is used, to prevent them sticking to the mould.
* Prepare at least 4 -6 of these and start frying. When frying the first batch, you can prepare the shells for the next batches. Also remember to grease the mould each time you use it, to avoid the shell sticking to it.
* Deep fry them on low flame until they turn golden brown and crisp. Fry as many kusli as your pan can fit without overcrowding. Frying on low flame is crucial in this recipe to achieve the crispiness of the outer shell. If fried on higher flame, they brown quickly and the shell would be softer as a poori.


23 comments:

nandoos Kitchen said...

We too make similar to this but the filling is different. With this healthy filling, sure it would have been yumm.. Nice one.. Keep rocking dear.

Hari Chandana said...

yes.. these are our kajjikayalu.. looks beautiful!!

Priya Suresh said...

Love ur wooden mould, even my mom have it.. Kusli looks very addictive.

Harini-Jaya R said...

One of my fav sweets in my childhood was kajjikayalu. I was also tempted to make kusli but I wasn't sure I could resist having all of them and so.. :)

Farin Ahmed said...

The name sounds interesting dear!!! Looks delicious

Sandhya Ramakrishnan said...

Same pinch Suma! I made the kusli too but yours look too perfect! Love the mould that you have used...

Varadas Kitchen said...

Nicely done. That is a cure mold you have.

Jayanthi Padmanabhan said...

i like your kusli maker.. works like a charm.. kuslis look perfectly made

Gayathri Kumar said...

Looks awesome Suma. I love your mould...

Sapana Behl said...

Just like our gujias but looks more yummy !

Pavani N said...

Khusli have turned out perfect Suma. Love that semolina - almond filling.

Kalyani said...

So much like our karjikai, isn't it ? And and I love the cute wooden mould .. Did u pick it up in India Suma ?

Nivedhanams Sowmya said...

oh that cute wooden mould... looks so authentic and apt for this delicious sweet!!

Usha said...

How nice, you have that karjika mould! I had listed down this for Chhattisgarh but ended up doing something different.

vaishali sabnani said...

That is a lovely mould. It surely makes the work easy and most of all maintains uniformity. I love the stuffing. .heavenly.

Chef Mireille said...

interesting to see the subtle differences in common dishes from state to state and I LOVE your mold!

Priya Srinivasan said...

Ahh, that is a cute mold you have!!! yes it looks just like our somasi!!! yum filling and a delicious snack!!

Nalini's Kitchen said...

Khusli sounds delicious and tempting,mouthwatering recipe..Even I was thinking to make this one but last minute I changed my mind and made kadi..

Sreevalli E said...

They are very much similar like kajjikayalu we make. Lovely sweet & it's my favorite.

Padmajha PJ said...

Though the states are apart, they do have similarities na!! Love your mould and the dish :)

Srivalli said...

Wow your Kusli has turned out so well..I am so tempted to have something on the lines of having a theme to cover this interesting aspect..same dish different stuffing..:)

Chitra Balasubramaniam said...

This is cool, please let me know where you picked up the mould from. I am fascinated by it. I have it in plastic but nothing like the good ole wooden one.
Thanks
Chitra

Suma Gandlur said...

Chitra, I bought it in India about 20 years ago.